Lists! Lists! Lists!

WAYS IN WHICH THE FRONT PORCH LIBRARIAN BREAKS WITH THE LIBRARIAN STEREOTYPE:

  1. She doesn’t own a cat.

    This librarian is a dog-person, all the way. (Isn't he handsome?)
    This librarian is a dog-person, all the way. (Isn’t he handsome?)
  2. No appliques. Ever.
  3. She enjoys making messes and really isn’t all that organized.
  4. No glasses – she only occasionally wears readers.

 

WAYS IN WHICH THE FRONT PORCH LIBRARIAN IS A STEREOTYPICAL LIBRARIAN:

  1. Loud rooms annoy her – she prefers quieter spaces.

    A sampling of my librarian footwear.
    A sampling of my librarian footwear.
  2. She dons comfy, librarian shoes.
  3. If you are going to the trouble to put something away, put it away exactly where it belongs, says she.
  4. She loves making lists.

 

CREATIVE WAYS IN WHICH YOU CAN GET YOUR CHILD TO PRACTICE A LITTLE READING AND WRITING OVER THE SUMMER:

  1. Write postcards and letters to friends and relations.
  2. Journaling and Scrapbooking.
  3. Make lists.

 

KINDS OF LISTS YOUR KIDDO CAN CREATE:

  1. Grocery and other to-buy lists (not that a list will keep you from purchasing twice as much as you intended when you make your next Target run).
  2. To-do and other honey-do and chore lists.
  3. Back-to-School (I’m sorry to have to go there already) lists.
  4. What you want for your birthday/Christmas/for the tooth fairy to bring you lists.
  5. A Bucket List – Things you want to do before you leave this world.
  6. A Goal List – Things you want to do this week, month, year…
  7. A R.A.K. List – Random Acts of Kindness list of all the people who you can do things for and different acts of kindness you can perform.
  8. Favorite lists (as in: what are your favorite foods? Movies? Types of animals? Ice cream flavors? Most kids love talking – or writing – about their favorite things. Oh, and? Make your own list – then you can compare your answers and get to know each other a bit!)
  9. Imaginative Lists. Get creative! Ask some off-the-wall questions, have your writer make a list in reply. Here are some examples to get you started:  ~If you discovered a new planet, what are some names you’d consider naming it?  ~When you grow up, what careers do you think you’d enjoy doing?   ~If you could create a new dessert, what ingredients would it include?   ~If you could go back in time and meet people – real or fictional – who would they be?   ~If you’re deserted on an island and can magically have 10 things from home, what would they be?

    Another idea: A Thankful List! Our ‘Thankful For’ chalkboard hangs in our kitchen.

 

WHY LISTS ARE AWESOME WRITING AND READING PRACTICE:

  1. Complete Sentences not required. Short ‘n sweet.
  2. Lots of White Space. Appear easy enough to pull off.
  3. You can get creative. (Colored pens? Add some glitter? Create a border?)
  4. They can be used. They’re practical.
  5. Un-fussy. Few instructions needed. (Everyone knows how to make a list!)
  6. They can be FUN!

Our children learn how to read and write in school – what better way to see their work in action through a useable list?

Keep Reading (and list making),

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Contact me at fplweb (at) frontporchlibrarian dot com

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